How to change wiper blades. As we’ve established over the years, you will find numerous relatively easy automotive maintenance tasks that you could conserve money on by doing yourself. Not only this, there’s an intrinsic satisfaction that accompany fixing something with your personal two hands, even if it is a simple task.

Let’s add compared to that list by showing you how to displace your windshield wipers. You’ll save probably $10-$15 per wiper blade over having it done at a store, and it’ll just take you about 15 minutes (less after you’ve done it a couple of times). That’s admittedly not a lot of money, but every small bit helps in the war on debt, and again, you’re gaining a touch of self-reliance to boot.

Let’s get directly to it.

When Should You Replace Your Wiper Blades?

The simplest way to tell if you want new wiper blades would be to simply gauge their effectiveness when being used on the road. Would be the wipers leaving the windshield (or at least the areas covered by the blades) just as wet and/or dirty because it started? Will there be some film/grime remaining after every pass of the blades? When it’s raining or snowing and your wipers come in use, do you will find yourself needing to view the street through one tiny spot of windshield that’s been successfully cleared? If you answer yes to any or most of these questions, it’s time for new blades.

Additionally you will know if your wipers need replacing should they create a chattering noise and don’t smoothly glide across the glass. And finally, you can certainly do a visual inspection. If the rubber looks worn or cracked, it’s time for a change. This usually happens annually, though it can just about depending on what often you use them and the environment you’re in.

Ultimately, if your wipers aren’t doing their job anymore and you’re having difficulty seeing the street in the midst of rain and snow showers, change’em out.

How to Change Your Wiper Blades?

1. Remove new blades from packaging and have them at the ready. The wiper arm is metal, and when you take away the old blade, it’s best to really have the new one ready right away in order to immediately replace it. There isn’t want to fiddle with packaging and have your wiper arm fall or be knocked on your windshield, possibly scratching or cracking it. That’s not terribly likely, but it is possible.

2. Lift the wiper, turn the blade perpendicular to the arm, and locate the release tab.

3. Press the tab and pull the blade down. Your instinct may be to yank up; don’t do that. You won’t damage anything, it’s only not going to truly get your blade off.

4. Next, turn the blade parallel to the arm, and pull it off. It’s that easy! Seriously.

5. Repeat this technique, backwards, to put in the new blade. Start parallel to the arm, thread it to the slot, then turn it perpendicular, and finally pull it slightly as much as lock it in place. You need to hear some sort of audible click, or at least believe that it’s snapped in, to ensure that the blade is currently properly installed.

6. Try with windshield wiper fluid. Give your windshield a squirt and try out the new blades. Then, be impressed with yourself, and slightly embarrassed that you’ve never done this incredibly simple DIY car maintenance task before.

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